Foot and Ankle Clinics

Operative Technique

September 1, 2015

Hallux rigidus is the most common arthritic malady to afflict the foot. A host of nonoperative measures can alleviate pain, and with failure of conservative treatment, joint preserving and joint sacrificing procedures can be used to treat persistent symptoms.

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Proximal Phalanx Hemiarthroplasty for the Treatment of Advanced Hallux Rigidus

September 1, 2015

Multiple treatment options exist for the management of late-stage hallux rigidus. The goals of treatment are pain reduction and restoration of function.

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The Use of Osteotomy in the Management of Hallux Rigidus

September 1, 2015

Metatarsus elevatus and gastrocnemius tightness contribute to the development of functional hallux rigidus.

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Open, Arthroscopic, and Percutaneous Cheilectomy for Hallux Rigidus

September 1, 2015

Cheilectomy consists of excision of the dorsal exostosis and part of the metatarsal head. It is typically performed for patients in the earlier stages of hallux rigidus presenting with dorsal pain and dorsiflexion stiffness in the absence of through-range symptoms, rest pain, and plantar pain and with negative result on grind test. If joint motion–preserving surgery is appropriate, then cheilectomy is generally considered to be the first-line surgical choice.

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Resurfacing of the Metatarsal Head to Treat Advanced Hallux Rigidus

July 8, 2015

Advanced stages of hallux rigidus are usually treated with various arthroplasties or arthrodesis. Recent results with resurfacing of the metatarsal head have shown promising results and outcomes similar or superior to those of arthrodesis. In this article, the authors show their preoperative decision making, surgical techniques, postoperative management, results, and a comparative literature review to identify metatarsal head resurfacing as an acceptable technique for the treatment of advanced hallux rigidus in active patients

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Moberg Osteotomy for Hallux Rigidus

July 8, 2015

Hallux rigidus is a common cause of pain and decreased range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, notably with loss of dorsiflexion. Hallux rigidus is the second most common disorder affecting the great toe. The primary cause of hallux rigidus is thought to be a traumatic event, a culmination of microtrauma, or an alteration in kinematics leading to a loss of articular cartilage and dorsal osteophyte formation

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Clinical Presentation and Management of Hallux Rigidus

July 2, 2015

Hallux rigidus is the most commonly occurring arthritic condition of the foot and is marked by pain, limited motion in the sagittal plane of the first metatarsophalangeal joint and varying degrees of functional impairment. In conjunction with clinical findings, radiographic grading helps guide therapeutic choices. Nonsurgical management with anti-inflammatory medications, corticosteroid injections, or shoewear and activity modifications can be successful in appropriately selected patients.

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Metatarsophalangeal Fusion Techniques with First Metatarsal Bone Loss/Defects

June 13, 2015

First metatarsophalangeal joint disorder is a common cause of chronic forefoot pain that is frequently encountered in the orthopedic clinic. Numerous surgical techniques have been described to improve patient pain and function in this regard, including prosthetic joint replacement, resection arthroplasty, and arthrodesis

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Metatarsophalangeal Joint Fusion

June 9, 2015

First metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint fusion aims at elimination of pain resulting from end-stage arthritis and obtaining a stable, plantigrade first toe. Associated deformities are corrected and greater defects are filled with interposition autograft or allograft

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First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Degeneration

June 5, 2015

Arthroscopic treatment of hallux rigidus is appropriate after failed nonoperative treatment. Debridement with cheilectomy, and fusion are the main indications for arthroscopic treatment of hallux rigidus

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