The International Journal of Lower Extremity Wounds

Predictors of Outcomes in Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis Treated Initially With Conservative (Nonsurgical) Medical Management: A Retrospective Study

August 27, 2015

The optimal way to manage diabetic foot osteomyelitis remains uncertain, with debate in the literature as to whether it should be managed conservatively (ie, nonsurgically) or surgically. We aimed to identify clinical variables that influence outcomes of nonsurgical management in diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

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Repairing Pretibial and Foot Soft Tissue Defects With Reverse Transplantation of the Medial Crural Fasciocutaneous Flap

August 18, 2015

Soft tissue defects of the pretibial area and the foot are among the most common complications in patients with lower extremity injuries and remain a challenge for surgeons. This study examined the clinical effects of repairing pretibial and foot soft tissue defects with a medial crural fasciocutaneous flap

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Vascular Pythiosis of the Lower Extremity in Northern Thailand: Ten Years’ Experience

August 18, 2015

Pythiosis is a disease caused by Pythium insidiosum , a fungus-like organism. P.

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Case Series of HIV Infection-Associated Arteriopathy: Diagnosis, Management, and Outcome Over a 5-Year period at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital,…

August 11, 2015

Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can present with 4 pathology types: drug-induced vasospasm (ergotism), arterial limb ischemia, critical limb ischemia, and aneurysm.

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Pathogenesis and Management of Buerger’s Disease

August 11, 2015

Buerger’s disease or thromboangiitis obliterans causes pain, ulceration, or gangrene in the lower or upper extremity. It is associated with chronic cigarette smoking and is believed to be an immune mediated vasculitis

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Can We Stop Antibiotic Therapy When Signs and Symptoms Have Resolved in Diabetic Foot Infection Patients?

August 6, 2015

The study aimed to investigate whether we can stop antibiotic therapy when signs and symptoms have resolved in diabetic foot infection (DFI) patients with different grades of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and those without PAD, and to determine whether the severity of PAD and infection has an effect on antibiotic therapy duration. A prospective randomized controlled trial of DFI patients was carried out

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