Leg stiffness asymmetry: clinical implications

All, I’ve just returned from Lecturing at the BBS 2014. One of the things I said which seemed to raise some interest was regard to asymmetry in leg stiffness (I was talking about compensation for leg length difference). Lets take me as an example: due to traumatic injury to me right knee, I demonstrate asymmetrical leg stiffness when performing hopping tests: K = 40 x SF2 x mass Where: K is the leg stiffness (N/m) 40 is (2x∏)2 SF is the step frequency (steps per second) Mass is measured in Kg my left K = 15,888 N/m; my right K = 11,610 N/m So, if we assume the body is trying to maintain a fairly consistant CoM displacement pathway during my walking gait cycle, how might my body compensate in an attempt to “equalize” the displacement under loading in light of variable left to right leg stiffness characteristics

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Leg stiffness asymmetry: clinical implications

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