health

Benefits of payment reform yet to be seen, research suggests

December 16, 2014

Despite the Affordable Care Act’s creation of accountable care organizations and its push toward value-based medicine, some of the nation’s highest-paid doctors still work largely under a fee-for-service model, according to an article from U.S. News & World Report. What’s more, research by the UCLA Department of Urology and the Veterans’ Health Administration suggests that providers who earn the most do so not by treating more patients, but by providing more services to individuals.

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The incidence of lower-extremity amputation and bone resection in diabetic foot ulcer patients treated with a human fibroblast-derived dermal…

December 16, 2014

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are frequently recalcitrant and at risk for infection, which may lead to lower-extremity amputation or bone resection. Reporting the incidence of amputations/bone resections may shed light on the relationship of ulcer healing to serious complications. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of amputations/bone resections in a randomized controlled trial comparing human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute plus conventional care with conventional care alone for the treatment of DFUs.

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New research to target physician attitudes toward payment reform

December 9, 2014

Amid the ongoing shift from fee-for-service healthcare reimbursement to value-based payments, much remains unknown about how clinicians’ mindsets and behaviors will also change as new models unfold. In search of these answers, two North­eastern Uni­ver­sity fac­ulty mem­bers at the Center for Health Policy and Health­care Research began a pilot study this fall in which they interview physi­cians and staff at about 10 prac­tices in Mass­a­chu­setts that are part of the New Eng­land Quality Care Alliance, according to a post from the university

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Women, blacks at greater risk for bunions

December 9, 2014

A large cohort study has confirmed several risk factors associated with hallux valgus: female sex, African-American race, older age, pes planus and knee/hip osteoarthritis (OA). The study, published online in Arthritis Care and Research found the highest prevalence of hallux valgus in African-American women: 70 percent.

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The effectiveness of footwear and other removable off-loading devices in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers: A systematic review

December 9, 2014

This aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review which examined the effectiveness of footwear and other removable off-loading devices as interventions for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers or the alteration of biomechanical factors associated with ulcer healing and to discuss the quality and interpret the findings of research to date.

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Regrowing cartilage could be the answer for people suffering from osteoarthritis in knees

December 1, 2014

There’s a glimmer of hope for some of the millions of people who suffer from osteoarthritis of the knees. Researchers have found a way to regrow cartilage in the knee and perhaps even prevent knee-replacement surgery, WCBS-TV’s Dr.

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Can wearing heels into your 70s save you from deadly accidents?

November 24, 2014

When should a woman stop wearing high heels? It may sound frivolous, but, in fact, high heels — and their effect on balance — could have serious implications for women’s health and even their lifespan

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New drug delivery system to heal diabetic foot ulcers

November 18, 2014

Stanford University School of Medicine researchers presented results at the American College of Surgeons Annual Clinical Congress showing they have developed a drug delivered via a skin patch that can heal wounds and prevent those wounds from reoccurring.

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Coaching: Breaking it down for healthcare leaders

November 18, 2014

Healthcare is experiencing a generational shift among its workforce, and younger generations have different beliefs and expectations about work than those currently retiring. Recruiting, hiring and terminations will continue to be expensive, especially for clinical and care-giving roles. This means that today’s leaders must make investments in retaining those with potential.

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Isolated Gastrocnemius Recession for Treatment of Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Pilot Study

November 11, 2014

Introduction.

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