journal

Evaluation of first metatarsal head declination through a modified distal osteotomy in hallux rigidus surgery. a cadaveric model

December 19, 2014

Publication date: Available online 18 December 2014 Source: Foot and Ankle Surgery Author(s): Jordi Asunción , Daniel Poggio , Manuel J. Pellegrini , Rodrigo Melo , José Ríos Background First metatarsal osteotomies have been described for treatment of hallux rigidus.

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Tuning Your Practice: Strategies to Consider in a Changing Health Care Environment

December 16, 2014

Visit link: Tuning Your Practice: Strategies to Consider in a Changing Health Care Environment

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Current Techniques and Future Direction

December 16, 2014

Arthroscopy of the foot and ankle has evolved from simply a diagnostic tool to a versatile treatment modality for a variety of pathologic abnormalities.

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Correlation Visual Analogue Scale Foot And Ankle (Vas-Fa) To Aofas Score In Malleolar Fractures Using Indian Language Questionnare

December 13, 2014

Publication date: Available online 12 December 2014 Source: Foot and Ankle Surgery Author(s): Ayyappan V. Nair , K.

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Subtalar Arthroscopy

December 13, 2014

The emergence of subtalar arthroscopy has improved the understanding and accuracy of diagnosing several hindfoot pathologic conditions, in particular, sinus tarsi syndrome. Subtalar arthroscopy has evolved into a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool

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The Press Reporting of ID and Antibiotics

December 12, 2014

USA Today ran an interesting story yesterday about a 19 year old woman given an antibiotic by a friend for a “sore throat” who developed Stevens Johnson Syndrome.  This is a terrible incident and my thoughts and prayers go out to the young woman and her family.  What bothered me however was the way in which USA Today reported it.  Here is the link: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/12/11/teen-antibiotic-burn-inside-out/20249585/ Yes, it was reported that there was a teen who took an antibiotic making her “Burn From the Inside Out” .  Talk about sensationalism!  It appears that they got that phrase from a physician they contacted.  Now, I’m not questioning the accuracy of that description but it is the use of it in the headline that makes me shake my head.  CNN reported the same story with a more sedate headline: “ A friend gave her an antibiotic; now she’s fighting for her life” http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/10/health/california-antibiotic-allergic-reaction/index.html?hpt=hp_t2 This just got me thinking about other ways in which the lay press reports on infectious diseases and antibiotics.  How many articles have been written on “Super Bugs”?  What ARE “super bugs” anyway?  In one story they may be MRSA, in another CREs.  What about “flesh eating bacteria”?  Some of us remember back about 15 years ago when this term first became popularly used in the press.  It referred to a series of cases of Group A Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis.  This was hardly a new infection, even back then.  It has probably been around since the beginning of time but boy did they run with it.  Then, within the past few years “flesh eating bacteria” somehow morphed from Group A Strep to MRSA.  Which is it?  Is it both?  I guess. Finally, since I have been asked frequently, let’s look at Ebola.  Now I am not, and have never claimed to be an expert on viral diseases in general and Ebola in specific.  I have never seen or treated a case and hope to never come across it.  However, just a few weeks ago you could not turn on the TV, pick up a newspaper or magazine and not read about this terrible disease.  In fact, Time Magazine, rightly IMHO, just named those who fight Ebola as their “People of the Year”.  However, let’s put this into perspective.  To the best of my knowledge there were only TWO cases actually contracted in the US and both of those were health care workers directly treating the first unfortunate patient in Dallas.  That did not stop the news sources from rolling out expert after expert about how this disease could potentially spread here in the States, or maybe not.  People were freaking out.   For the first time in all my years of travel I was seeing folks wearing surgical masks on airplanes and taking out sanitizing wipes to treat the airplane seats and trays before sitting down (actually, probably not a bad idea!).  But, as the old saying goes, “today’s news is tomorrow’s fish wrapper”. Other than the Time story, I don’t think I have seen anything about the disease in a few weeks.

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Histological Evaluation of Calcaneal Tuberosity Cartilage – A Proposed Donor Site for Osteochondral Autologous Transplant for Talar Dome Osteochondral…

December 12, 2014

Publication date: Available online 11 December 2014 Source: Foot and Ankle Surgery Author(s): Moez S. Ballal , Michael Lutz , Rupinderbir S. Deol , Christopher J.

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Isolated Talonavicular Joint Arthrodesis Through Minimal Incision Surgery

December 11, 2014

Publication date: Available online 28 November 2014 Source: Foot and Ankle Surgery Author(s): A.

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Patient satisfaction and function after bilateral ankle arthrodeses

December 11, 2014

Publication date: Available online 24 November 2014 Source: Foot and Ankle Surgery Author(s): Philip Vaughan , David Gordon , Andy Goldberg , Nick Cullen , Dishan Singh Background The optimum way to manage patients with bilateral ankle arthritis (AA) is unclear. Methods This review was performed to report the midterm satisfaction and functional outcome of a series of patients who have undergone bilateral staged ankle arthrodesis. Results Eight patients, median age 68.5 yrs (range 59–80) were followed-up for a median of 58.5 months (range 24–100)

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