journal

Role of Fixation and Postoperative Regimens in the Long-Term Outcomes of Distal Chevron Osteotomy: A Randomized Controlled Two-by-Two Factorial Trial…

October 24, 2014

The necessity of chevron osteotomy fixation is controversial and evidence for the effectiveness of postoperative regimens is limited. In a prospective, randomized study, we compared the long-term results of 2 operative techniques (osteotomy fixation versus no fixation) and 2 postoperative regimens (a soft cast versus an elastic bandage) in 100 patients who underwent surgery for hallux valgus

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Screw Placement Relative to the Calcaneal Fracture Constant Fragment: An Anatomic Study

October 18, 2014

Placement of a screw from the lateral wall of the calcaneus into the constant sustentaculum tali fragment can be difficult when surgically repairing a calcaneal fracture. This screw serves to compress the fracture fragments and support the posterior facet.

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What Can I Do With a Patient With Diabetes and Critically Impaired Limb Perfusion Who Cannot Be Revascularized?

October 17, 2014

A patient with limb-threatening diabetic foot syndrome in whom relevant peripheral arterial occlusive disease is proven should receive arterial revascularization as soon as possible to avoid major amputation.

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Lipedema: A Review of the Literature

October 17, 2014

Lipedema is a disorder of adipose tissue that primarily affects females and is often misdiagnosed as obesity or lymphedema. Relatively few studies have defined the precise pathogenesis, epidemiology, and management strategies for this disorder, yet the need to successfully identify this disorder as a unique entity has important implications for proper treatment.

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Intraosseous Gouty Tophus at the Talus: A Case Report

October 17, 2014

Isolated intraosseous gouty invasion is a rare presentation of gout. Although most patients will have a history of gouty arthritis or hyperuricemia, others will have an insidious onset of local pain, tenderness without significant swelling, or inflammation. Surgical debridement is the mainstay of treatment for intraosseous tophus formation.

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Surgical Treatment of Calcaneal Fractures of Sanders Type II and III by a Minimally Invasive Technique Using a Locking Plate

October 17, 2014

The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcomes of surgical treatment of calcaneal fractures of Sanders type II and III using a minimally invasive technique and a locking plate. We reviewed 33 feet in 33 consecutive patients with Sanders type II and III calcaneal fractures who had undergone a minimally invasive technique using percutaneous reduction and locking plates

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Autogenous Capsular Interpositional Arthroplasty Surgery for Painful Hallux Rigidus: Assessing Changes in Range of Motion and Postoperative Foot…

October 16, 2014

The autogenous capsular interpositional arthroplasty procedure can be a motion-sparing alternative to arthrodesis for the treatment of recalcitrant hallux rigidus deformity. Previous studies have reported positive results; however, many had small samples or lacked comparable preoperative measures

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Use of an All-Suture Anchor for Re-Creation of the Anterior Talofibular Ligament: A Case Report

October 16, 2014

The lateral ankle ligament complex is typically injured during athletic activity caused by an inversion force on a plantar flexed foot.

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Excision of Elephantiasis Nostras Verrucosa Lesions in a Patient With Hereditary Lymphedema: Case Report and Review of the Literature

October 16, 2014

Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa (ENV) is a rare cutaneous sequela of chronic lymphedema. Treatment of ENV remains poorly elucidated but has historically involved conservative management aimed at relieving the underlying lymphedema, with a few cases managed by surgical intervention

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Female physicians more persuasive, study suggests

October 14, 2014

Patients are more likely to agree on the appropriateness of their physicians’ advice on nutrition, exercise or weight loss if their doctors are female, according to a study published in Family Practice. The study of 585 patients and 27 general-practice doctors in three regions in France found that men with male doctors were nearly four times more likely than men with female doctors to disagree with them about nutrition; men with male doctors were twice as likely to disagree about exercise; and female patients agreed with male doctors about weight-loss advice only 85.5 percent of the time, compared to 93 percent of the time with female doctors.

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