management

Predicting recurrence after clubfoot treatment

April 7, 2015

In the search for factors that predict recurrence after use of the Ponseti method for successful treatment of idiopathic clubfoot, conclusive evidence is in short supply. However, the one factor that is consistently associated with the risk of recurrence is compliance with brace wear.

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Data is no less secure even as HIPAA enforcement is here

April 7, 2015

The headlines are endless and ever-growing: Healthcare data is at risk. However, despite continued efforts to address security loopholes across the sector, simply “taking action” to mitigate damage is not an effective strategy, and it won’t work long term.

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When A Child Presents With Internal Tibial Torsion And Femoral Varus

March 31, 2015

Issue Number:  Volume 28 – Issue 4 – April 2015 Author(s):  Jodi Schoenhaus, DPM, FACFAS This author offers insights on the surgical treatment of a 4-year-old boy with femoral varus and internal tibial torsion. Section:  Online Exclusive

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Where Can I Learn More About Biomechanics?

March 31, 2015

Residents and practitioners always ask me where they can go to learn more about lower extremity biomechanics. The obvious reason is their desire to improve their foot orthotic therapy skills and decision making for reconstructive foot and ankle surgery. I have found the answer to this question to be elusive

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Flatfoot in School-Age Children: Prevalence and Associated Factors

March 29, 2015

Background . Flatfoot has been shown to cause abnormal stresses on the foot and lower extremity.

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Creating An Effective Learning Environment For Your Residents

March 26, 2015

We were all there at one point. In fact, we should all still be there in the midst of an ongoing learning phase

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Doctors continue to hate their jobs — Is the ACA to blame?

March 24, 2015

In news that we likely all knew (or had an inkling of), physicians are less happy than they have been or could be, a new survey suggests. There are a number of reasons for the lack of job satisfaction, including bureaucracy and a greater focus on technology and data entry, but the data reflected here — in a recent survey from the healthcare solutions group Geneia — is nothing new. The fact is that physicians are not able to practice according to their own desires and that they are overwhelmed large amounts of paperwork and regulations of the healthcare market.

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Ankle Impingement Caused by an Intra-articular Plica: A Report of 2 Cases

March 24, 2015

Entrapment of soft tissues in the anterolateral gutter of the ankle can cause impingement. When symptomatic, patients complain of chronic ankle pain exacerbated with dorsiflexion

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Hallux Varus: An Underreported Presentation of Rheumatoid Arthritis

March 24, 2015

The prevalence of hallux varus deformity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been reported to be extremely rare. However, in South Asian Countries, where open-toed shoes are habitual footwear for the majority of people, we have found that hallux varus is a common deformity in patients with RA. This rate of occurrence is much more common than that in published hallux deformities in RA and reinforces the impact of footwear on the development of hallux deformities.

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What Is A ‘Normal’ Foot?

March 23, 2015

Issue Number:  Volume 28 – Issue 4 – April 2015 Author(s):  Kevin A. Kirby, DPM Podiatrists commonly use the terms “normal” and “abnormal” to describe foot structure and foot function. We might look at a set of plain film radiographs and note that one foot has a hallux valgus angle that we call “normal” while the contralateral foot has a hallux valgus angle that we call “abnormal.” We might also do gait examinations in our office and tell one patient that his gait appears normal while in another patient, we may say that her gait appears abnormal

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